Tools Needed

Photo Item Name Where to Purchase Quantity Price
Grinder
  • Online
  • Compatible Technology International
1 $100.00

Materials Needed

Cutting Utensil

Photo Item Name Suggested Recycled Materials Where to Purchase Quantity Price
Cutting knife
  • Walmart
  • KMart
  • Cutlery store

N/A

1 $10.00

Features

N/A

Recommendations

N/A

Specifications

N/A

Dehydrator

Photo Item Name Suggested Recycled Materials Where to Purchase Quantity Price
Drying Nets/ Dehydrator
  • unused screen material
  • Walmart
  • KMart
  • Don Quijote
  • Fishing Stores
2-4 $15.00

Features

N/A

Recommendations

  • Dehydrators can also be made very easily with scrap pieces of wood and screen material.
  • It is important to dry the ulu soon after it is cut, as it can spoil quickly.
  • Ensure your dehydrator is covered and enclosed to protect the fruit from rain, dirt, pests and moderate winds.

Specifications

N/A

Container

Photo Item Name Suggested Recycled Materials Where to Purchase Quantity Price
Ziploc bags - gallon size
  • sealable containers
  • recycled clean ziploc bags
  • recycled 5 gal bucket
  • Any grocery store
1 Box $5.00 or Free

Features

N/A

Recommendations

N/A

Specifications

N/A

Fruit

Photo Item Name Suggested Recycled Materials Where to Purchase Quantity Price
Ulu (Breadfruit)

N/A

  • Farmer’s Market
  • Tamura’s in Kalihi
2-4 $$3 per lb. or Free

Features

N/A

Recommendations

N/A

Specifications

N/A

Step 1.

Cut the ripe ulu fruit in half and remove the seed pod and skin.

Step 2.

Slice each half in to thin pieces. The thinner the slices, the faster it dries in the dehydration process.

Step 3.

Place the pieces in the dehydrator, and leave it out in the sun for at least two days.

Step 4.

When the ulu pieces are completely dry and brittle, break them into small pieces and put them through the grinder. Keep the ulu flour in a sealed container for future use.

Common Questions & Answers

Besides food, what else can ulu/ulu trees be used for?

Although well known as a food crop, ulu has long been valued for its medicinal elements, termite resistant wood (used for home and canoe construction), and bast fibers (used for cloth and cordage production). Additionally, research has shown that the ulu sap can be used as a natural latex.

What does ulu taste like?

Although breadfruit is a member of the fig family, it tastes more like sweet potato.

How do you prepare the fruit?

It can be eaten either ripe or unripe. Remove the skin and seed core, then cut the fruit into small pieces. Similar to how you would prepare potatoes, either boil, steam or deep fry them. As a dessert, you can also sprinkle brown sugar on the top (of the ripe fruit) and bake it as well

How can you tell if the ulu fruit is ripe?

Ripe ulu is usually light green and yellow in color, with white drops of sap on the skin. It will also be softer to the touch when pressing on the outside.

Do ulu trees require a lot of maintenance?

Not really. Interestingly, ulu trees are very hearty – they can survive droughts of up to 4 months, has a high tolerance of salt/saline soils, and can withstand humid lowland conditions.

Can ulu be used as a feed stock for animals?

Yes. Ulu has been used as animal feed. In fact, it has been reported that when using ulu as chick feed, it results in less weight gain and slower maturity than when using cassava or maize.

What’s the best way to store the ulu?

Once ripe, ulu fruit decomposes at a fairly rapid rate. Thus, it is best to use the fruit right away. However, if you pick the ulu green and unripe, you can store it in a brown paper bag until it ripens. Do NOT store the fruit in the refrigerator (ulu can be easily damaged by the chill).